Study Title:

Rejuvenating cellular respiration for optimizing respiratory function: targeting mitochondria.

Study Abstract

Altered bioenergetics with increased mitochondrial reactive oxygen species production and degradation of epithelial function are key aspects of pathogenesis in asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). This motif is not unique to obstructive airway disease, reported in related airway diseases such as bronchopulmonary dysplasia and parenchymal diseases such as pulmonary fibrosis. Similarly, mitochondrial dysfunction in vascular endothelium or skeletal muscles contributes to the development of pulmonary hypertension and systemic manifestations of lung disease. In experimental models of COPD or asthma, the use of mitochondria-targeted antioxidants, such as MitoQ, has substantially improved mitochondrial health and restored respiratory function. Modulation of noncoding RNA or protein regulators of mitochondrial biogenesis, dynamics, or degradation has been found to be effective in models of fibrosis, emphysema, asthma, and pulmonary hypertension. Transfer of healthy mitochondria to epithelial cells has been associated with remarkable therapeutic efficacy in models of acute lung injury and asthma. Together, these form a 3R model-repair, reprogramming, and replacement-for mitochondria-targeted therapies in lung disease. This review highlights the key role of mitochondrial function in lung health and disease, with a focus on asthma and COPD, and provides an overview of mitochondria-targeted strategies for rejuvenating cellular respiration and optimizing respiratory function in lung diseases.
Copyright © 2016 the American Physiological Society.
KEYWORDS:
asthma; chronic obstructive pulmonary disease; lung; mitochondria; pulmonary hypertension

Study Information


Rejuvenating cellular respiration for optimizing respiratory function: targeting mitochondria.
Am J Physiol Lung Cell Mol Physiol.
2016 January

Full Study

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26566906