Study Title:

Effects of a short-term Interval Aerobic Training Programme with active Recovery bouts (IATP-R) on cognitive and mental health, functional performance and quality of life: A randomised controlled trial in sedentary seniors.

Study Abstract

BACKGROUND:
Interval aerobic training programme with active recovery bouts (IATP-R) has shown to improve tolerance to IATP among seniors. However, data concerning its benefits for seniors' health are still limited.

PURPOSE:
The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of IATP-R on seniors' health status.

METHODS:
Sedentary volunteers (n = 60, aged ≥70 years) were randomly assigned to either IATP-R or maintained sedentary lifestyle for 9.5 weeks. IATP-R consisted of 30-minute cycling (6 × 4 minutes at first ventilatory threshold (VT1 ) intensity + 1 minute at 40% of VT1 ) twice a week. Cognitive and functional performances were assessed with the Trail Making Test (TMT-A; TMT-B); Paced Auditory Serial Addition Test (PASAT); Timed Up and Go (TUG) test; 6-Minute Walk Test (6-MWT); one-leg balance test; and the Short Physical Performance Battery (SPPB) tests, respectively. QoL and anxiety/depression status were measured by the Short Form-12 and the Goldberg's Scale, respectively. All participants were assessed at baseline and 9.5 weeks later.

RESULTS:
Compared to controls, IATP-R improved cognitive functions (TMT-A: +1.5% vs -21.5%; TMT-B: +0.9% vs -13.3%; PASAT: +1.4% vs -14.6%; semantic fluency: -1.1% vs +11.7%), functional performance (TUG: +5.4% vs -16.5%; 6-MWT: -3.2% vs +11.5%; SPPB: -3.2% vs +14.6%; One-leg balance: -16.3% vs +25.0%); QoL (physical health: -13.3% vs +23.1%; mental health: -7.1% vs +8.2%); and depressive symptoms (+26.3% vs -42.8%). Significant impacts were measured neither on letter modality of fluency tasks nor on anxiety score.

CONCLUSION:
These data showed that IATP-R is an effective training programme to improve functional and cognitive performances, mental health and well-being in sedentary seniors. Trial registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT02263573. Registered October 1, 2014.

Study Information

Int J Clin Pract. 2019 Jan;73(1):e13219. doi: 10.1111/ijcp.13219. Epub 2018 Jul 2.

Full Study

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/29963733