A Lifetime of High Fiber Intake Reduces Cardiovascular Disease Risk

May 3, 2011 | Byron J. Richards, Board Certified Clinical Nutritionist

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 A Lifetime of High Fiber Intake Reduces Cardiovascular Disease Risk
If you want to implement healthy actions today, to prevent problems down the road, then ensuring adequate fiber intake is a key strategy for future cardiovascular health.

The new study is based on a statistical analysis of data coming from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey, a nationally representative sample of about 11,000 adults. It was presented March 23 at the American Heart Association's Nutrition, Physical Activity and Metabolism/Cardiovascular Disease Epidemiology and Prevention Scientific Sessions 2011 in Atlanta, Ga.

It confirms the findings of another recent fiber study showing that higher fiber intake reduced mortality risk by 22%2, also showing a lower risk of death from cardiovascular, infectious, and respiratory diseases by 24% to 56% in men and by 34% to 59% in women.

Our government's recommendation of 25 grams of fiber per day is the minimum – and most Americans only get ½ that. Fiber intake ranging from 30 grams up to 60 grams may be vital for health, especially if a person is overweight.

Referenced Studies

  1. ^ Load Up on Fiber Now, Avoid Heart Disease Later  American Heart Association's Nutrition, Physical Activity and Metabolism/Cardiovascular Disease Epidemiology and Prevention.   Donald M. Lloyd-Jones, M.D, et al.
  2. ^ Dietary Fiber Intake and Mortality  Arch Intern Med.  Yikyung Park, ScD; Amy F. Subar, PhD; Albert Hollenbeck, PhD; Arthur Schatzkin, MD.

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