Study Title:

TSH Receptor Antibody Measurement in the Diagnosis and Management of Graves’ Disease Is Rarely

Study Abstract

GRAVES’ hyperthyroidism is an autoimmune disease sustained by autoantibodies binding to and activating the TSH receptor located on the thyroid follicular cell. The diagnosis of Graves’ hyperthyroidism is based upon clinical symptoms, signs and laboratory tests confirming the presence of thyrotoxicosis, such as diffuse goiter, ophthalmopathy, an elevated thyroid 123I uptake and homogenous distribution of 123I on scan, positive thyroid peroxidase (TPO) and less commonly thyroglobulin (Tg) antibodies, and finally, positive serum TSH receptor antibodies (TRab). TRab have been measured by different methods and, therefore, bear different terms depending upon their ability to inhibit the binding of TSH to its receptor, TSH binding inhibiting immunoglobulins (TBII), and their capacity to stimulate and activate the TSH receptor as assayed by the release of cAMP from isolated thyroid cells in culture thyroid stimulating antibodies, (TSab). - See more at: http://press.endocrine.org/doi/10.1210/jcem.83.11.5056-2#sthash.0pmtoyEa.dpufJ

Study Information

Elio Roti, Lewis E. Braverman, and Leslie J. DeGroot, M.D. - See more at: http://press.endocrine.org/doi/10.1210/jcem.83.11.5056-2#sthash.0pmtoyEa.dpuf
TSH Receptor Antibody Measurement in the Diagnosis and Management of Graves’ Disease Is Rarely Necessary - See more at: http://press.endocrine.org/doi/10.1210/jcem.83.11.5056-2#sthash.0pmtoyEa.dpuf
JCEM
2011 April

Full Study

http://press.endocrine.org/doi/10.1210/jcem.83.11.5056-2