Study Title:

Subclinical hypothyroidism and the risk of metabolic syndrome: a meta-analysis of observational stud

Study Abstract

BACKGROUND:
Observational studies on the association between subclinical hypothyroidism (SCH) and metabolic syndrome (MetS) have produced inconsistent results. Therefore, we performed a meta-analysis to evaluate the effect of SCH on the risk of MetS.
METHODS:
Multiple databases were searched to identify studies on the association between SCH and the risk of MetS, up to February 2015. Relevant information for analysis was extracted. A random-effects model was used to calculate the pooled risk estimates.
RESULTS:
9 studies (7 cross-sectional and 2 case-control studies) were included. The pooled odds ratio (OR) for MetS comparing SCH with euthyroid subjects was 1.31 (95%CI: 1.08 to 1.60, p = 0.006, I2 = 50%). Subgroup analyses by countries revealed a significant association for the studies from Asian (OR = 1.244, 95% CI: 1.030-1.503, I2 = 25%) other than non-Asian (OR = 1.548, 95% CI: 0.925-2.591, I2 = 73.5%) countries. A positive association was identified in the IDF subgroup (OR = 1.288, 95% CI: 1.055-1.572, I2 = 0%), but not in the NCEP-ATP III (OR = 1.351, 95% CI: 0.950-1.923, I2 = 66.4%), Chinese (OR = 1.430, 95% CI: 0.891-2.294) and Japanese (OR = 1.542, 95% CI: 0.594-4.005, I2 = 78.3%) subgroup. A certain degree of heterogeneity was observed among studies which cannot be explained by study design, diagnostic criteria and location.
CONCLUSION:
Our results demonstrated that SCH was significantly associated with a higher risk of MetS. Well-designed cohort studies were warranted to confirm our findings.
KEYWORDS:
meta-analysis; metabolic syndrome; subclinical hypothyroidism

Study Information


Subclinical hypothyroidism and the risk of metabolic syndrome: a meta-analysis of observational studies.
Endocr Res.
2016 March

Full Study

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26934475