Study Title:

Risk of myocardial infarction in patients with psoriasis.

Study Abstract

CONTEXT:

Psoriasis is the most common T-helper cell type 1 (T(H)1) immunological disease. Evidence has linked T(H)1 diseases to myocardial infarction (MI). Psoriasis has been associated with cardiovascular diseases, but has only been investigated in hospital-based studies that did not control for major cardiovascular risk factors.
OBJECTIVE:

To determine if within a population-based cohort psoriasis is an independent risk factor for MI when controlling for major cardiovascular risk factors.
DESIGN, SETTING, AND PATIENTS:

A prospective, population-based cohort study in the United Kingdom of patients with psoriasis aged 20 to 90 years, comparing outcomes among patients with and without a diagnosis of psoriasis. Data were collected by general practitioners as part of the patient's medical record and stored in the General Practice Research Database between 1987 and 2002, with a mean follow-up of 5.4 years. Adjustments were made for hypertension, diabetes, history of myocardial infarction, hyperlipidemia, age, sex, smoking, and body mass index. Patients with psoriasis were classified as severe if they ever received a systemic therapy. Up to 5 controls without psoriasis were randomly selected from the same practices and start dates as the patients with psoriasis. A total of 556,995 control patients and patients with mild (n = 127,139) and severe psoriasis (n = 3837) were identified.
MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE:

Incident MI.
RESULTS:

There were 11,194 MIs (2.0%) within the control population and 2319 (1.8%) and 112 (2.9%) MIs within the mild and severe psoriasis groups, respectively. The incidences per 1000 person-years for control patients and patients with mild and severe psoriasis were 3.58 (95% confidence interval [CI], 3.52-3.65), 4.04 (95% CI, 3.88-4.21), and 5.13 (95% CI, 4.22-6.17), respectively. Patients with psoriasis had an increased adjusted relative risk (RR) for MI that varied by age. For example, for a 30-year-old patient with mild or severe psoriasis, the adjusted RR of having an MI is 1.29 (95% CI, 1.14-1.46) and 3.10 (95% CI, 1.98-4.86), respectively. For a 60-year-old patient with mild or severe psoriasis, the adjusted RR of having an MI is 1.08 (95% CI, 1.03-1.13) and 1.36 (95% CI, 1.13-1.64), respectively.
CONCLUSIONS:

Psoriasis may confer an independent risk of MI. The RR was greatest in young patients with severe psoriasis.

Study Information


Risk of myocardial infarction in patients with psoriasis.
JAMA.
2006 October

Full Study

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17032986/