Study Title:

Lymphocyte DNA damage and oxidative stress in patients with iron deficiency anemia.

Study Abstract

Oxidant stress has been shown to play an important role in the pathogenesis of iron deficiency anemia. The aim of this study was to investigate the association between lymphocyte DNA damage, total antioxidant capacity and the degree of anemia in patients with iron deficiency anemia. Twenty-two female with iron deficiency anemia and 22 healthy females were enrolled in the study. Peripheral DNA damage was assessed using alkaline comet assay and plasma total antioxidant capacity was determined using an automated measurement method. Lymphocyte DNA damage of patients with iron deficiency anemia was significantly higher than controls (p<0.05), while total antioxidant capacity was significantly lower (p<0.001). While there was a positive correlation between total antioxidant capacity and hemoglobin levels (r=0.706, p<0.001), both total antioxidant capacity and hemoglobin levels were negatively correlated with DNA damage (r=-0.330, p<0.05 and r=-0.323, p<0.05, respectively). In conclusion, both oxidative stress and DNA damage are increased in IDA patients. Increased oxidative stress seems as an important factor that inducing DNA damage in those IDA patients. The relationships of oxidative stress and DNA damage with the severity of anemia suggest that both oxidative stress and DNA damage may, in part, have a role in the pathogenesis of IDA.

Study Information


Lymphocyte DNA damage and oxidative stress in patients with iron deficiency anemia.
Mutat Res.
2006 October

Full Study

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16920160/