Study Title:

Lower Blood Pressure Is Associated With Smaller Subcortical Brain Volumes in Older Persons

Study Abstract

BACKGROUND:
Both high and low blood pressure (BP) have been positively as well as negatively associated with brain volumes in a variety of populations. The objective of this study was to investigate whether BP is associated with cortical and subcortical brain volumes in older old persons with mild cognitive deficits.
METHODS:
Within the Discontinuation of Antihypertensive Treatment in the Elderly trial, the cross-sectional relation of BP parameters with both cortical and subcortical brain volumes was investigated in 220 older old persons with mild cognitive deficits (43% men, mean age = 80.7 (SD = 4.1), median Mini-Mental State Examination score = 26 (interquartile range: 25-27)), using linear regression analysis. All analyses were adjusted for age, gender, volume of white matter hyperintensities, and duration of antihypertensive treatment. Brain volumes were determined on 3DT1-weighted brain magnetic resonance imaging scans.
RESULTS:
Lower systolic BP, diastolic BP, and mean arterial pressure (MAP) were significantly associated with lower volumes of thalamus and putamen (all P ≤ 0.01). In addition, lower MAP was also associated with reduced hippocampal volume (P = 0.035). There were no associations between any of the BP parameters with cortical gray matter or white matter volume.
CONCLUSION:
In an older population using antihypertensive medication with mild cognitive deficits, a lower BP, rather than a high BP is associated with reduced volumes of thalamus, putamen, and hippocampus.
© American Journal of Hypertension, Ltd 2015. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.
KEYWORDS:
blood pressure; brain; cross-sectional study; elderly; hypertension; magnetic resonance imaging.

Study Information


Lower Blood Pressure Is Associated With Smaller Subcortical Brain Volumes in Older Persons
Am J Hypertens.
2015 September

Full Study

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25714132