Study Title:

Fasting Serum Glucose and Cholesterol as Predictors of Cardiovascular Reactivity to Acute Stress in

Study Abstract

OBJECTIVE:
African Americans are at a greater risk of cardiovascular hyperactivity to stress than Caucasians; however the risk factors for this activity are not clearly delineated for African Americans. The purpose of this study was to determine the ability of fasting serum cholesterol concentration and fasting serum glucose (FSG) to predict cardiovascular reactivity to stress in African Americans.
DESIGN, SETTING, PARTICIPANTS:
Serum cholesterol concentration and FSG levels were measured in 48 (40 women, 8 men) African American college students aged 18-30 years. Heart rate, cardiac output, stroke volume, mean arterial pressure and systolic and diastolic blood pressure were measured as the participants viewed a racially noxious scene on a digital video disc. Measurements were taken prior to the scene (pre stressor period), during the scene (stressor period), and while the participant recovered from the scene (recovery period).
RESULTS:
A multiple regression analysis revealed that total serum cholesterol and LDL significantly predicted diastolic blood pressure during the pre-stressor period. FSG significantly predicted mean arterial pressure during the recovery period, and predicted stroke volume during the pre-stressor period, stressor period, and the recovery period.
CONCLUSIONS:
FSG was a better predictor of cardiovascular reactivity to stress than serum cholesterol concentration, predicting mean arterial pressure and stroke volume. This finding may be due to the association of glucose with diabetes, which is more prevalent in African Americans.

Study Information


Fasting Serum Glucose and Cholesterol as Predictors of Cardiovascular Reactivity to Acute Stress in a Sample of African American College Students
Ethn Dis.
2015 April

Full Study

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26118145