Study Title:

Developmental and tissue-specific regulation of the Q10 class I gene by DNA methylation.

Study Abstract

The H-2 class I genes encode cell-surface glycoproteins that play a critical role in the immune presentation of aberrant cells. The Q10 class I gene, however, encodes a secreted glycoprotein that is highly homologous to the membrane-bound molecules. While the H-2 genes are activated in all tissue types, the expression of the Q10 gene is restricted to only the liver. Analysis of DNA from different tissues revealed a unique methylation profile for the Q10 gene in liver. Developmental activation of this gene in newborn mice is also reflected by a coordinated temporal change in DNA methylation. By comparing the methylation profiles between congenic mice, which differed in their levels of expression of the Q10 gene, it is observed that methylation at the 3'-flanking region correlates with expression. Methylations were at both CG and CC sequences. Since treatment of newborns with 5-azacytidine, which led to inhibition of methylation, resulted in the suppression of Q10, we conclude that hypermethylation in the 3'-flanking region is responsible, at least in part if not in full, for the activation of the Q10 gene in the liver.

Study Information


Developmental and tissue-specific regulation of the Q10 class I gene by DNA methylation.
Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A.
1986 October

Full Study

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/2429311