Study Title:

Association between hypertension and chronic arsenic exposure in drinking water: a cross-sectional s

Study Abstract

Chronic arsenic exposure and its association with hypertension in adults are inconclusive and this cross-sectional study investigated the association. The study was conducted between January and July 2009 among 1,004 participants from 1,682 eligible women and men aged ≥30 years living in rural Bangladesh who had continuously consumed arsenic-contaminated drinking water for at least 6 months. Hypertension was defined as systolic blood pressure ≥140 mmHg (systolic hypertension) and diastolic blood pressure ≥90 mmHg (diastolic hypertension). Pulse pressure was calculated by deducting diastolic from systolic pressure and considered to be increased when the difference was ≥55 mmHg. The prevalence of hypertension was 6.6% (95% CI: 5.1-8.3%). After adjustment for other factors, no excess risk of hypertension was observed for arsenic exposure >50 μg/L or to that of arsenic exposure as quartiles or as duration. Arsenic concentration as quartiles and >50 μg/L did show a strong relationship with increased pulse pressure (adjusted OR: 3.54, 95% CI: 1.46-8.57), as did arsenic exposure for ≥10 years (adjusted OR: 5.25, 95% CI: 1.41-19.51). Arsenic as quartiles showed a dose response relationship with increased pulse pressure. Our study suggests an association between higher drinking water arsenic or duration and pulse pressure, but not hypertension.

Study Information


Association between hypertension and chronic arsenic exposure in drinking water: a cross-sectional study in Bangladesh
Int J Environ Res Public Health.
2012 December

Full Study

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23222207